Ever wanted to find out what your audience really thinks about your presentation? Fed up of collecting paper feedback forms? Then there may be an answer in PheedLoop.

PheedLoop is a cute little tool for presenters to gather feedback from their audiences, without the need for printed sheets or awkward face to face feedback moments. So what does it do?

PheedLoop lets you add the details of your upcoming presentations to the system and then provides you with a URL which audience members can access to provide feedback. With the feedback received you can then view the scores submitted and also any comments provided – tracking your progress from presentation to presentation.

How do you use it?

Let’s walk though setting up a presentation in the tool.

Once you’ve signed up and logged into PheedLoop, you’ll be presented with your dashboard:

Pheedloop review Dash

The dashboard shows the current presentations  loaded into the system. The feedback for the selected talk can also be found here, as well as options to search talks,  and create new talks.

Let’s hit New Talk and set up the feedback page for our next presentation. On clicking the button, we are presented with the next screen:

Pheedloop review New Presentation

 

You can fill out the details of your presentation, a title, description, date and other information. You can even add the presentation file to the talk, so it can be accessed by the audience after the presentation.  Once you’ve completed the form, click the Create Talk button:

Pheedloop review Presentation Created

Now you’ll be presented with a custom link,which you can modify to make it easier to type/remember. Then you simply share this with your audience at the end of your presentation. When your audience is ready, they can access the link and provide feedback on the presentation. Here’s a typical view the audience will have after clicking the link:

Pheedloop review Feedback

The audience can then provide feedback on your presentation in four categories: Organisation & Clarity; Relevance/Usefulness; Delivery; Overall Impression. You can also add your own categories to the four provided.

A message or question can also be sent to you at this point – which you can respond to directly through PheedLoop if the contributor provides an emails address.

Additional features

So that’s the basic use of the tool, however there are a few additional features that are pretty cool and worth pointing out:

Track your progress

A neat feature is you can track your progress, so you can see how you’ve improved from presentation to presentation in the various categories:

Pheedloop review Track Your Progress

 

Export your data

Once you’ve gathered your presentation feedback, you can export the data into an excel file and take it out of PheedLoop and use it elsewhere – whether you are reporting progress in an internal report, or you want to create slide content containing the progress data, you’ll be able to build the content easily with the excel data sheet.

Calendar included

There’s a calendar displaying all your presentations, so you can track and plan your talks direct in the PheedLoop system.

Tag-tastic

You can add tags to your presentations, so they can be categorised in the system and then searched and reported on within PheedLoop. This makes things a little easier once you’ve lots of talks tagged and loaded into the system.


After playing around with the tool, what do I think of PheedLoop? Well I have to say it seems a pretty neat idea, gathering feedback on presenting is always a good thing, and if there’s an easier, quicker way to do this then I’m all for it.

The ability to share a link with your audience at the end of your presentation and then receive the feedback at a later date, means you are more likely to get honest feedback, rather than everyone ticking average on the paper handout you’ve provided (while you stand over them). I do have a suspicion that the delay in  receiving the feedback (due to audience members having to be online to provide their thoughts) will mean less people will actually fill in the feedback form.

I can see uses for the tool in a training environment, it’s pretty typical to feedback on a course once you’ve attended it as a delegate. However if you are presenting a sales pitch I feel it’s unlikely you’ll want to ask for feedback at the end of your pitch on how it was presented, although if you did I’m sure you’d get a great deal of insight for your next pitch!

The main thing with feedback  is to actually act upon it. The ability to track progress with PheedLoop should give most people incentive enough to try to incorporate the feedback and improve their presentation delivery.

The tool is still in beta testing at the moment, and I have to stay the team developing it have been open to feedback themselves – in fact I actually suggested the export feature and it was incorporated within a week! If you’ve any suggestions for improvement, I’m sure the team would love to hear from you.

Once out of beta testing, I understand there will be a subscription fee for the tool. I haven’t heard what the expected cost for the tool will be, but I think for such a simple (but effective) tool – it would be more useful as part of a bigger service, and whether the stand alone piece can warrant a subscription fee remains to be seen.

Overall anyone who presents often would do well to use PheedLoop to gather their audience’s feedback, as long as you act on the feedback and aim to improve your presentations for your next audience.

If you sign up for PheedLoop, please let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Written by

Karl Parry

Operations manager

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  1. Image of Ricky Ricky says:

    Hi Karl,

    Thank you so much for this absolutely phenomenal review! We couldn’t have said it better ourselves! Things are moving very quickly with PheedLoop, with new features being added and changes being made several times per day – primarily based on feedback from kind users like yourself.

    To address some of your points:

    – If you don’t fancy the delay in receiving feedback (i.e. viewing it after your presentation), we’re going to have a really cool live feedback feature coming up very soon! Note that your audience members don’t have to leave feedback during the presentation itself, and can just as well leave it later on if they save the link.

    – It’s true, asking for feedback in some environments can get shaky. One technique we have found to be helpful is to not mention the feedback aspect of it in those situations, and say something along the lines of: “to download my slides/file and connect with me, visit this link”. Submitting feedback happens naturally once someone visits the link.

    – We truly believe that tracking progress is incredibly important. We are working on algorithmic approaches to recommend personalized strategies based on a user’s past performance, and more!

    Thanks again, Karl!
    Ricky

  2. Image of Karl Parry Karl Parry says:

    No problem Ricky – glad to hear things are moving along well. Looking forward to seeing more!

  3. Image of Mikki Donaldson Mikki Donaldson says:

    How is PheedLoop doing in 2019? Is it still as wonderful as it was a few years ago?

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