PowerPoint’s morph transition really is a game-changing feature in the world of presentations. You no longer have to be a presentation animation expert to create dynamic and eye-catching content. We’ve written a guide on using morph, and you can read that here. But even though we love this feature, it’s not without it’s faults. So here’s a handy tip for using PowerPoint morph with multiple objects.

 

How PowerPoint morph works

At a basic level, morph recognises common objects that appear across multiple slides and animates them to create lovely, smooth transitions like this:

powerpoint morph

 

The difficulty of morphing multiple objects

Morph is especially helpful if you want to animate multiple objects across multiple slides; it saves you having to animate each object individually. But sometimes PowerPoint isn’t that great at recognising which object is which when you morph it – particularly if you have several of the same type of object (e.g. multiple rectangles).

In the image below we have three slides with different arrangements of the same shapes. Let’s say we want to move the shapes on Slide 1 to the formation on Slide 3, via the formation on Slide 2.

powerpoint morph

But if we create the three slides above, and add a morph transition to each, this is what happens:

powerpoint morph

PowerPoint can’t recognise which rectangle is moving to which position, so we get a jumbled mess instead of the smooth transition we want.

 

How to morph multiple objects

Step 1: The solution, you’ll be glad to know, is simple. Add a letter to each shape. Now, PowerPoint can recognise which shapes are the same when it morphs them.

powerpoint morph

Step 2: Now we can make the text transparent (so that it doesn’t spoil your lovely design). To do that, select the objects, navigate to the ‘Format’ tab. Select ‘Text Fill’ and then choose the ‘No Fill’ option.

powerpoint morph

Step 3: Add the morph transition and watch your shapes effortlessly glide to their new (and correct) position.

powerpoint morph

If you loved this tip, take your morphing skills another level with this tutorial that will teach you how to use morph to animate a 3D Death Star.

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Written by

Alessandro Rizzi

Design consultant

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  1. Image of Kolja Kolja says:

    Sweet hack! Even works with multiple instances of the same image by applying different fill colors and setting their transparency to 100… Thanks for the help!

    • Image of Sandy Rushton Sandy Rushton says:

      Hi Kolja, thanks for the feedback. That’s a great trick with the transparencies! We’ll definitely be using it.

  2. Image of Xeroink Xeroink says:

    This I really great.
    Thank you for the insight.
    I really love and appreciate the work you do at Brightcarbon.

  3. Image of Ms Paulie Point Ms Paulie Point says:

    Selecting objects to morph. I see how this works with boxes and hidden text. Nice!
    But I have lines that separate elements on the page, and I want them to transition along with other elements.
    However, like your example, PP doesn’t always know which line to morph where. No way to add text to line elements.
    Tried “Alt Text” but this didn’t help.

    Any cool suggestions?

    • Image of Alessandro Rizzi Alessandro Rizzi says:

      Hello Ms Paulie, thanks for your comment. My suggestion would be to group each line to a transparent shape containing a different letter, with a similar result as shown in the article. Another way, but you would lose editing capabilities, would be to copy and paste each line back into the deck as a picture. Let us know if any of these works!

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